News & Media

The National Collaborative for Health Equity presents the latest news, articles, events and program highlights to help you stay connected and informed.

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Losing a Grocery Store Changes a Neighborhood

Losing a Grocery Store Changes a Neighborhood

Articles | February 22 2017

By Emily Payne, Alexina Cather, Charles Platkin, and Emma Cosgrove Victor Papa was born in 1945 on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. “Never left and never will,” said the 71-year-old president of the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, a...

Racial gaps in wages, wealth, and more: a quick recap

Racial gaps in wages, wealth, and more: a quick recap

Articles | February 21 2017

by Elise Gould Recently, I had the opportunity to present some key facts on 1A, a new NPR news program, about the state of black America. Drawing heavily upon research by my colleague Valerie Wilson and her co-author William Rodgers III, I...

Black, Latino Two-Parent Families Have Half The Wealth Of White Single Parents

Black, Latino Two-Parent Families Have Half The Wealth Of White Single Parents

Articles | February 20 2017

By Adrian Florido The racial wealth gap has been measured and studied for decades. One fact has remained the same: White families build and accumulate more wealth more quickly than black and brown families do. The reasons for this are multiple...

Race, Place, and Chronic Disease: Segregation as a Root Determinant of Health Inequities

Race, Place, and Chronic Disease: Segregation as a Root Determinant of Health Inequities

Events | February 16 2017

Please save the date of March 1 for the March 2017 presentation of the Commissioner’s Brown Bag: When: Wednesday, March 1, 2017 12:00 - 1:30pm Who: Brian Smedley, Ph.D., Co-Founder and Executive Director of the National Collaborative for...

Dr. Mary Bassett: We Must ‘Name Racism’ As A Cause of Poor Health

Dr. Mary Bassett: We Must ‘Name Racism’ As A Cause of Poor Health

Articles | February 14 2017

The Huffington Post The following is excerpted from Dr. Mary Bassett’s October 2016 acceptance speech, ‘Public Health Meets the ‘Problem of the Color Line,’ for Columbia University’s Frank A. Calderone Prize in Public Health. Bassett...

How Segregated Schools Built Segregated Cities

How Segregated Schools Built Segregated Cities

Articles | February 13 2017

by Emily Lieb More than six decades after the Brown vs. Board of Education decision, increasing numbers of black children in the U.S. attend what researchers call “apartheid schools” where students of color comprise more than 99 percent of...

Did You Know Black Ghettos Were Deliberately Created By Gov’t Sponsored Redlining?

Did You Know Black Ghettos Were Deliberately Created By Gov’t Sponsored Redlining?

Articles | February 10 2017

By A.C. Jemison In light of Dr. Ben Carson’s nomination as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and the commencement of the Trump Administration, there is no better time than now to discuss the creation of the “black ghetto” and...

Why Succeeding Against the Odds Can Make You Sick

Why Succeeding Against the Odds Can Make You Sick

Articles | February 8 2017

In 1997, a few hundred people who responded to a job posting in a Pittsburgh newspaper agreed to let researchers spray their nostrils with a rhinovirus known to cause the common cold. The people would then be quarantined in hotel rooms for five days...

Five key trends in U.S. student performance

Five key trends in U.S. student performance

Articles | February 1 2017

By Martin Carnoy and Emma García Progress by blacks and Hispanics, the takeoff of Asians, the stall of non-English speakers, the persistence of socioeconomic gaps, and the damaging effect of highly segregated schools In 15 years of increasing...

Redlining suit against Chaska’s KleinBank tests limits of bias laws

Redlining suit against Chaska’s KleinBank tests limits of bias laws

Articles | January 30 2017

By Jeffrey Meitrodt, Star Tribune A discrimination lawsuit the U.S. Department of Justice recently filed against a family-owned community bank in the Twin Cities’ western suburbs could become the first test of the government’s ability to...