Building the Capacity of Public Health to Advance Equity

The National Collaborative for Health Equity (NCHE) and Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University (Milken Institute SPH) of Washington, DC; along with Prevention Institute (PI) of Oakland, Calif., will take stock of existing public health departments’ practices and policies relevant to equity, community engagement, and social determinants of health. Using this data, they will identify opportunities and strategies that health departments can employ to advance racial, social, and health equity.

CULTURE OF HEALTH LEADERS

We’re excited to announce the 40 new leaders joining our second cohort of Culture of Health Leaders! Find out who’s leading the charge! #CultureofHealth. For more information visit www.cultureofhealth-leaders.org.  The National Collaborative for Health Equity and CommonHealth ACTION are proud to co-lead Culture of Health Leaders, a national leadership development program preparing leaders from all sectors to promote health equity and build healthy communities.

Introducing a New Brand

COLLABORATIVES FOR HEALTH EQUITY

The National Collaborative for Health Equity is proud to partner with leaders around the country working to advance health equity. This initiative, formerly known as Place Matters, seeks to improve community conditions for health under a new brand identity: COLLABORATIVES FOR HEALTH EQUITY.

Health Opportunity and Equity (HOPE) Measures Project

The HOPE Measures project aims to expand understanding of the determinants and drivers of health opportunity for a diverse set of stakeholders including policymakers, researchers, advocates, public administrators and communities and provide analyses that spur action on inequities.

Health Equity Leadership & Exchange Network (HELEN)

The Health Equity Leadership & Exchange Network (HELEN) is a collaborative effort between the National REACH Coalition, Morehouse School of Medicine, and the National Collaborative for Health Equity.  The HELEN project will strengthen health equity leadership and increase the number of sustainable campaigns that play an important role in offering community education and mobilization.

EVERYONE DESERVES A CHANCE TO ACHIEVE THEIR BEST POSSIBLE HEALTH

National Collaborative for Health Equity - Working with people, partners, and a purpose

In our country, not everyone has a fair chance to achieve their best health. In particular, many communities of color face one barrier after another to the opportunity for good health. There are many reasons for this, including a lack of healthy food, safe playgrounds for children, and inviting places for citizens to work, learn, and study.

At the National Collaborative for Health Equity, we’re working to identify and address the social, economic, and environmental causes of racial and ethnic health inequities, and to build the kinds of leadership and partnerships necessary to improve conditions for health.
We work within and with our communities – recognizing and honoring their deep knowledge, power, and resiliency – to eliminate health inequities and the systems that produce them.

We’ll continue to work to reverse the damage resulting from racism and other destructive social hierarchies across a range of sectors and areas of life. Our goal is to support and arm leaders with tools in their field to advance equity through programs and initiatives that build leadership, connect partners and sectors, and measure conditions for health.
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Our Programs

The National Collaborative for Health Equity works to advance health equity by measuring conditions for health, building leadership, and connecting partners and sectors to dismantle structures and systems that maintain status quo inequality.

NEWS & MEDIA

Who Benefits from Gentrification?

Who Benefits from Gentrification?

Articles | November 17 2017

By Peter Dreier When affluent people compete with poor people for a scarce supply of housing, guess what happens? Home prices and rents go up, and the poor are pushed out. In a nutshell, that's the formula that fuels gentrification. Most news...

Gentrification Comes to Atlanta’s Last Working Class Black Neighborhood

Gentrification Comes to Atlanta’s Last Working Class Black Neighborhood

Articles | November 15 2017

By Cliff Albright Walk into the home of Robert and Bertha Darden, and you are immediately surrounded by memories. Like many African American couples who have reached a certain age, the front room of their house is full of photos – of the...

Rev. William Barber Honored by MCF, ABFE and HIP

Rev. William Barber Honored by MCF, ABFE and HIP

Articles | November 14 2017

SEATTLE – Marguerite Casey Foundation, a national philanthropy that believes no family should live in poverty, is pleased to announce that The Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II – who launched the “Moral Monday” peaceful protests in North...

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TESTIMONIALS

“Everyone deserves the opportunity to attain their highest level of health. The National Collaborative for Health Equity is leading us there by building a diverse team of change agents, who together can reduce health disparities and create the healthiest nation.”

Georges C. Benjamin, MD, Executive Director of APHA, American Public Health Association

“At a time when racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequality is increasingly in the national headlines, the National Collaborative for Health Equity is building on more than a decade of related work with diverse community leaders across America. Together they are building support for interventions that help to identify and undo the health consequences of racism, the embedded belief in a hierarchy of human value. Their work continues to help communities and our nation heal.”

Dr. Gail C. Christopher, D.N. Vice President, Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation, W.K Kellogg Foundation

“NCHE is at the forefront of the health equity movement – advancing the national conversation, bringing policymakers and stakeholders together, and developing innovative strategies to meet the needs of underserved communities. I look forward to our continued collaboration on these critical endeavors.”

Daniel E. Dawes, J.D.

Dr. Brian D. Smedley