Drawing on interviews with grassroots leaders from across the country, this report explores how the political landscape, funding, staff skills, leadership, and partnerships influence the ability of community-based organizations to work effectively with public health agencies to address health inequities and racial injustices.

What we heard from the grassroots leaders we spoke to was a tremendous openness to strengthening their own organizations and the public health institutions they partnered with to learn, grow, and become ever more effective in their efforts to achieve more equitable health outcomes. We also uncovered challenges grassroots organizations and health agencies face. Here, we articulate the structural factors, the organizational practices, and ways of navigating partnerships and community engagement that have facilitated grassroots organizations and health agencies working together to advance health equity.

This paper was made possible by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Download full publication: Partnering for health equity: Grassroots organizations on collaborating with public health agencies

In January/February 2015, the National Voices Project (NVP) conducted the Boys and Young Men of Color (BYMOC) survey, in partnership with the National Collaborative for Health Equity (NCHE). The survey was administered by GfK, an international survey research organization that maintains KnowledgePanel, a nationally representative, web-enabled panel of adults 18 years or older across the United States.

Some key findings in the report includes:

Read the full Impact Report (PDF)

In January/February 2015, the National Voices Project (NVP) conducted the Girls and Young Women of Color survey, in partnership with the National Collaborative for Health Equity (NCHE). The survey was administered by GfK, an international survey research organization that maintains KnowledgePanel, a nationally representative, web-enabled panel of adults 18 years or older across the United States.

Some key findings in the report includes:

(Read the Full Impact Report PDF)

In 2009, the PLACE MATTERS teams embarked upon a process called “blueprinting” that bought together subject matter experts, communities, and other stakeholders in a problem solving process for documenting lessons, process,  methods, and strategies in ways that are useful for PLACE MATTERS Team’s work in communities.  The Community Strategies to End Racism report highlights key strategies and tactics, through this report, which can be tailored to address  health inequities in other communities and jurisdictions.

Place Matters: Advancing Health Equity documents some of the Place Matters Team’s early successes and efforts  to transform how communities understand and tackle persistent racial and ethnic health inequities.

This study, carried out by leading researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, provides important insight into how much of a fi nancial burden racial disparities are putting on our health care system and society at large. The researchers examined the direct costs associated with the provision of care to a sicker and more disadvantaged population, as well as the indirect costs of health inequities such as lost productivity, lost wages, absenteeism, family leave, and premature death.

This report tracks the stubborn persistence of concentrated poverty—poverty rates over 30 percent—in U.S. metropolitan areas over a period of nearly 40 years. Neighborhoods with povertyrates above 30 percent have been recognized as places with few opportunities for employment and education, high levels of disinvestment and crime, and meager civic participation. Living in such neighborhoods over extended periods reduces the life chances of children, whether their families are poor or not.

A series of reports commissioned in 2006 to the identify the social determinants confronting young men of color, and present public policy recommendations to address those obstacles, paving the way for a positive environmental change for this demographic group.

This report provides a comprehensive review of general and specific ACA provisions with the potential to significantly improve health and health care for millions of diverse populations and their communities.

In this report, we present an inventory of health care jobs occupied by people of color, and the changes in occupation mix over time. We then estimate job growth in the health care industry and present potential job opportunities for people of color. If we assume the current racial and ethnic distribution of the health care workforce persists, we would expect that in the future at least one-third of the total health care workforce will comprise people of color. This estimate is almost certainly lower than what will occur, because many people of color – especially Blacks and Hispanics – are in occupations that are among the fastest growing in the U.S.