To build a society where all Americans can live their healthiest and most vibrant lives free from discrimination, everyone needs to be seen. Having good data that fully reflect America’s diversity will move our nation in the right direction and allow all communities to thrive. For the first time since 1997, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) expanded its race and ethnicity standards to capture historically excluded communities, who will now be visible in federal data collection for the first time.

On April 11, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Commission to Transform Public Health Data Systems held a briefing to discuss OMB’s updated race and ethnicity standards and the implications for our public health data systems.

Speakers included:

We invite you to watch the recording:

(Media briefing held by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Commission to Transform Public Health Data Systems)

Congratulations to Monica Haslip, founder of Little Black Pearl and NCHE collaborator in the Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation (TRHT) movement building efforts.

Her 30-year success is a direct result of her vision, creativity, and commitment to Chicago’s youth and communities of color.

(Learn More)

By Washington Post Live, https://www.washingtonpost.com/

“The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted and exacerbated the country’s economic, racial, and health disparities. California’s Health and Human Services Secretary Mark Ghaly and Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health assistant professor Kizzmekia S. Corbett join Washington Post Live to discuss health equity, the lessons learned from the pandemic, and how we can better prepare for and respond to the next one.”

(Read more)

PBS NewsHour, Video

“While inflation eased slightly last month, it continues to remain high and new data shows it’s having an outsized, negative impact on Native American, Black and Latino families in particular, according to a poll out this week from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard University. Alonzo Plough, chief science officer of the foundation, joins William Brangham to discuss the specifics.”

(View video)

EPISODE 1: The first episode of APHA and Complexly’s web series “That’s Public Health” introduces the basics of public health and why it is so important.

 

EPISODE 2: Health equity is a public health approach that focuses on addressing avoidable, unnecessary, and unjust health differences, and works toward improving everyone’s health. This second episode of the “That’s Public Health” web series from APHA and Complexly explains how.

The National Day of Racial Healing 2022

(video posted by:W.K. Kellogg Foundation)

The 6th annual National Day of Racial Healing is dedicated to exploring #HowWeHeal from the effects of individual and systemic racism. Launched on Jan. 17, 2017, it creates a sense of belonging through a shared humanity, inspiring collective action to make a world that is more just and equitable.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Medical Association Foundation sponsored the Prioritizing Equity Spotlight session moderated by Dr. Gail C. Christopher.

As part of a three-part series, physician leaders will discuss the history of racism in medicine, its impact on public health and the health care systems that exist today, and how providers and organizations can work towards truth, racial healing and reconciliation.

Dr. Christopher lead panel experts in discussing the inequities seen during COVID-19 through a TRHT Framework. Other panelists included:

• José A. Rico, Director Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT) Greater Chicago
• Andrea King Collier, Author & Journalist
• Alieza Durana, Narrative Change Liaison, Princeton’s Eviction Lab
• Anton C. Bizzell, M.D., The Bizzell Group, President and CEO
• Dr. Yolanda Lewis-Ragland, FAAP, FABOM, CEO and Founder, Family Fitness & Wellness, LLC
• Mike Malmberg, Colleges of the Fenway, Director of Environmental Health and Safety

View Recording: HERE

The King Center Presents: Beloved Community Global Summit – Day 2: https://fb.watch/35ma6YiTHv/

Video by The Atlantic

African Americans face disproportionate rates of lead poisoning, asthma, and environmental harm. Staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II argues that discrimination in public planning is to blame. “Pollution and the risk of disaster are assigned to black and brown communities through generations of discrimination and political neglect,” says Newkirk II. The environment is a system controlled and designed by people—“and people can be racist.”