EPISODE 1: The first episode of APHA and Complexly’s web series “That’s Public Health” introduces the basics of public health and why it is so important.

 

EPISODE 2: Health equity is a public health approach that focuses on addressing avoidable, unnecessary, and unjust health differences, and works toward improving everyone’s health. This second episode of the “That’s Public Health” web series from APHA and Complexly explains how.

The National Day of Racial Healing 2022

(video posted by:W.K. Kellogg Foundation)

The 6th annual National Day of Racial Healing is dedicated to exploring #HowWeHeal from the effects of individual and systemic racism. Launched on Jan. 17, 2017, it creates a sense of belonging through a shared humanity, inspiring collective action to make a world that is more just and equitable.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Medical Association Foundation sponsored the Prioritizing Equity Spotlight session moderated by Dr. Gail C. Christopher.

As part of a three-part series, physician leaders will discuss the history of racism in medicine, its impact on public health and the health care systems that exist today, and how providers and organizations can work towards truth, racial healing and reconciliation.

Dr. Christopher lead panel experts in discussing the inequities seen during COVID-19 through a TRHT Framework. Other panelists included:

• José A. Rico, Director Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT) Greater Chicago
• Andrea King Collier, Author & Journalist
• Alieza Durana, Narrative Change Liaison, Princeton’s Eviction Lab
• Anton C. Bizzell, M.D., The Bizzell Group, President and CEO
• Dr. Yolanda Lewis-Ragland, FAAP, FABOM, CEO and Founder, Family Fitness & Wellness, LLC
• Mike Malmberg, Colleges of the Fenway, Director of Environmental Health and Safety

View Recording: HERE

The King Center Presents: Beloved Community Global Summit – Day 2: https://fb.watch/35ma6YiTHv/

Video by The Atlantic

African Americans face disproportionate rates of lead poisoning, asthma, and environmental harm. Staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II argues that discrimination in public planning is to blame. “Pollution and the risk of disaster are assigned to black and brown communities through generations of discrimination and political neglect,” says Newkirk II. The environment is a system controlled and designed by people—“and people can be racist.”

(MSNBC) – Trump’s media availability drew intense criticism from the right. Former GOP Rep. David Jolly says today may be the start of a primary movement to replace Trump. He joins Lawrence O’Donnell and Jarvis DeBerry to discuss Trump’s long pattern of bigoted behavior. | Duration: 8:46

By Lilly Workneh

A new video released Monday titled “The Talk” compellingly tackles the impact of racial bias through the lens of black parents in America.

The video ― which was released by My Black Is Beautiful, a beauty brand owned by Procter & Gamble ― is a powerful two-minute clip that explores racial bias by depicting some of the burdens placed on parents of black children, who are challenged with having necessary but difficult discussions with their children about their survival and self-esteem.

The video follows several black parents who have talks with their children about the ways in which their skin color can affect how they are perceived and treated by others. In one scenario, a mom asks her son if he has his ID before heading to practice, in case he is stopped by police. In another, a mother instructs her daughter, who is a new driver, on what to do in case she is pulled over by a cop. In the opening scene, a young girl is seen telling her mom that she was told she was “pretty for a black girl,” to which her mother later responds sternly: “You’re not pretty for a black girl. You’re beautiful period.”

Cuyahoga County Community Health Improvement Plan Presentation & Q&A (57:55 )

Martha Halko
Deputy Director, Prevention & Wellness
Cuyahoga County Board of Health
Gregory Brown
Executive Director, PolicyBridge
President, Brown & Associates Consulting Services

By Tracee Wilkins

In some Prince George’s County, Maryland, neighborhoods, you can drive for miles without seeing a proper grocery store. The county has been labeled a “food desert” because of the lack of healthy options — especially in the county’s communities inside the Beltway. But some community leaders are working to bring more healthy options. News4 Prince George’s County Bureau Chief Tracee Wilkins reports.