Exciting strides are being made to create a more equitable food system in South Texas!

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NCHE’s executive director, Dr. Gail Christopher, interviewed Michael R. Crawford, associate dean for strategy, outreach, and innovation at Howard University College of Medicine, to discuss the public health data landscape and the importance of building a digitally equitable health ecosystem that benefits everyone.

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California leads with a historic move: the first state to unveil a slavery reparations package – a strong step towards rectifying the past.

By Lara Korte, Politco

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NCHE celebrates 10 Black women suffragists—unsung heroes who fought tirelessly for voting rights, both before and after the 19th Amendment.

By Eliza Siegel, Stacker
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Sixty eager minds chose Charles Drew University (CDU) for their first cohort, intrigued by a curriculum that dives into social determinants of health like housing, reliable transportation, and proximity to pharmacies and clinics. See how CDU’s innovative approach is shaping future healthcare pros!

By Abené Clayton, The Guardian

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Black farmers are turning food deserts into oases across the US, tackling lack of access to fresh, affordable produce head-on. Turning tables on obesity and disease, these unsung heroes are at the forefront of the food justice movement.

By Alexa Spencer, Word in Black

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By Dara Mathis, New York Times

On June 24, 1983, Byllye Avery welcomed 2,000 Black women to Spelman College for the First National Conference. They shared their stories, inspiring remarkable change and a reminder of how health is inevitably affected by racism.

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By the Washington Informer

The House of Representatives and Senate organized a powerful Briefing on Wednesday, Nov. 29th, to discuss systemic racism & racial justice! Speakers provided their expertise & personal experiences to shed light on how systemic racism perpetuates inequalities. Also discussed were policy changes & systemic reforms to support an equitable & inclusive society. Our executive director, Dr. Gail C. Christopher, attended the briefing, and we thank her for her significant contributions to the conversation.

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By Nicquel Terry Ellis, CNN

The average life expectancy of Native Americans has dropped significantly in recent years. Graduates of University of North Dakota’s new doctoral program in Indigenous health are working to reduce disparities and create better health outcomes for Native communities. Their efforts are invaluable to ensure everyone can live longer and healthier lives.

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By: Kristine L. Rhodes, MPH, Abigail Echo-Hawk, MA, Jordan P. Lewis, PhD, MSW, Vanesscia L. Cresci, MSW, MPA, Delight E. Satter, MPH & Denise A. Dillard, PhD, Sage Journals

As the first scientists on the American continents, the research pursuits of American Indian and Alaska Native peoples used a variety of methods for understanding and responding to complex environmental factors for the wellbeing of their communities. Because of colonialism and attempts to eradicate tribal cultures, most of this knowledge has been stolen or lost. This has been detrimental to the health and wellbeing of American Indian and Alaska Native people.

Today’s public health data systems do not reflect or serve the needs of tribal peoples and prevent tribes from assessing health risks and trends, tracking illnesses, and making data-informed decisions.

Understanding and respecting American Indian and Alaska Native data equity is a crucial piece of health equity. In a new article in Public Health Reports, American Indian and Alaska Native public health data experts share what needs to be done to make this a reality.

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